HOW Family genealogy
Genealogy of the HOW family - originally of Kent, England
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1 "Mother was alone trying to keep the family home going in London during WW II, so there was always a welcome for anyone coming on leave. Our house 'Glenlea', in Dulwich was quite a large one and at one time had about 50 large window panes blown out by bomb blast, but luckily we did not suffer any severe damage.
"Edith was in the Women's Voluntary Service [W.V.S.], later the Women's Royal Voluntary Service, in which she served throughout the war. This was a purely civilian organisation ready to help in a practical way at any emergency, but they were not officially nurses.
"The family's first car was a Wolseley Hornet, circa 1934. Edith was the driver." writes Mary WICKES 
JONES, Edith Emily (I00045)
 
2 "Shirley was my mother, you mention her in your site as an Oregon How. She was very interested in tracing the How family during her lifetime and had contacted Norman How in England.", Lindsey How-Downing BRANDNER, Shirley Jean (I670)
 
3 8 Acacia Place, Hampton
1876 Grocers Company's School, Hackney Down, Clapton
Retired from Schoolmastering in 1904 & moved to Leigh on Sea, Essex.
 
GERNAT, Francois (I00403)
 
4 A Coach Builder by trade GIBOIRE, Jean Marie (I608)
 
5 A HUGE contributor to this HOW tree! HOW, Karilyn Marie (I00081)
 
6 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I00074)
 
7 Abraham and Katherine's marriage date was found in the Hadlow Parish Register. HOW, Abraham (I00169)
 
8 According to the death certificate (see below) the cause of death is "Potassium Cyanide poisoning, self administered accidently while working in the laboratory" HOW, Alfred Edward (I00283)
 
9 aka Gualteri HOW HOW, Walter (Gualteri) (I00165)
 
10 aka Gualterus HOW HOW, Gualterus (I00163)
 
11 aka Margereta FENN, Margaret (Margareta) (I00166)
 
12 aka Willeimi HOW HOW, William (Willelmus) (I00365)
 
13 At the moment there appears to be little evidence for this marriage but I believe it is correct. Family F237
 
14 Born at 10 Beech Walk, Ewell, Surrey in 1926
Moved in 1936 approx to St. Piran (house name), West Farm Close, Ashstead 
GERNAT, Mary (I00147)
 
15 Born January 12, 1959 in Festus the son of the late Grace Virginia (nee Clow) and Stephan Ewing How.
He was a commercial journeyman roofer for over 20 years, a member of the American Legion Auxiliary and the Festus/Crystal City Conservation Club. 
HOW, Stephen Parker (I692)
 
16 Came from Belgium with wife in 1850 and settled in Hampton
Was a Butler (domestique) but then opened a grocery shop in 151 High Street, Hampton Hill.
 
GERNOT, Francois (I00410)
 
17 Cause of death: Pneumonia, natural causes HOW, Alfred (I539)
 
18 Date from Headstone ENGEL, Claude Erwin (I00249)
 
19 Death date from Headstone HOW, Hettie Lucille (I00248)
 
20 Death: Shot down over Boulogne Docks, France, during the Battle of Britain. HOW, Douglas James (I00132)
 
21 Died from Pneumonia/Flu GERNAT, Frances (I00389)
 
22 Died in a car accident (see death cert below) HOW, Alfred John (I00286)
 
23 Died in Train Wreck at Sulphur Springs.
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mostfran/railroad/sulphur_spring1922.htm 
EICHMEYER, Isabelle D. (I00317)
 
24 Died in World War I HOW, Albert Edward (I545)
 
25 Died in World War I GERNAT, Herbert (I00420)
 
26 Died in World War II GERNAT, Peter R (I00429)
 
27 Died of Bronchitis HOW, James Edwin (I00430)
 
28 Died of Influenza HOW, Rhoda Priscilla (I00049)
 
29 Died of Scarlet Fever HOW, Rhoda Jemima (I00431)
 
30 Died prematurely on day of birth. HOW, Unknown (I703)
 
31 Died with her husband Denis in a car accident in Wales. MITCHELL, Joy Cope Davidson (I00126)
 
32 Died with his wife in a car accident in Wales. HOW, Denis Frank (I00125)
 
33 Edith and Albert were twins, Edith died shortly after birth at 5.00am, 9 January 1884 HOW, Edith (I546)
 
34 Elfrida's surname was shortened to BURK BOEHSMAN, Elfrieda Caroline (I00306)
 
35 Enid Blyton Society entry for Mary GERNAT http://www.enidblytonsociety.co.uk/book-groups.php?pick=illustrator&value=Mary+Gernat
 
GERNAT, Mary (I00147)
 
36 Extract from Will in which James and Others are named:
Source: Norm Keaton, Prerogative Court of Canterbury, Probate 4 Jun 1831
Eleanor Culmer of Birchington, spinster, will dated 22 Oct 1830
To be buried near my late sister Elizabeth Culmer and my family at Stourmouth
Elizabeth Dowker widow of Mr John Dowker son of my aunt Elizabeth Dowker
Mrs Mummery of Manston
Mr John Philpott of Margate, carpenter
Mess'rs Stephen and William Stoats, deceased
Friend Mr John Tomlin of Quex Farm, Birchington, gentleman, executor
James How late of Goodnestone
Mr John Duckett of St Johns Street, Margate, stone mason
Maria Boulton
Elizabeth How eldest daughter of my late cousin Mary deceased wife of James How
Martha Gibson wife of Mr Charles Gibson of Ashford, inn keeper, youngest daughter of my said late cousin Mary How, executrix
Maria How, widow, executrix
James How of Goodnestone, butcher, son of said James How deceased, executor
Margaret Knight widow of Henry knight late of Preston next Wingham, miller Widow Taylor of Birchington
Occupiers John Mummery and Abraham Mummery at Ash next Sandwich
Witnesses Peter Wootton - Mary wilson - John Love.  
HOW, James Nicholas (I00180)
 
37 Findagrave memorial # 128911457 HOW, Marian Louise (I00307)
 
38 From a web site about illustartors at http://www.janebadgerbooks.co.uk/illustrators/marygernat.html
"Mary Gernat (1926-1998) was probably one of the most prolific cover artists of the 1960s. She was born in Ewell, Surrey in 1926, and trained at the Central School of Arts and Crafts in Kingsway and at Regent Street Polytechnic. Mary had a large family, and combined looking after them with working as a freelance illustrator from home via an agent. Her family of four sons and a daughter were often "pressed into service as models". Although she did not ride herself, she particularly enjoyed painting ponies. During her time as a illustrator, she provided many paperback covers for Collins' paperback imprint, Armada as well as for the Atlantic Publishing Co (Dragon) in the 1960s. Mary's son Roger told me she met Enid Blyton, whose paperback editions she illustrated, but she was not enamoured by her, and found her an "odd person". Mary Gernat suffered from multiple sclerosis during later life, which though it affected her mobility, did not affect her art. After she stopped working commercially, she carried on painting around Lymington, where her family lived. Her son Roger said:
"Painting was my Mum's life and even when she stopped commercial painting, she carried on around our area, producing 1-2 paintings a day for 30 years or so.I am a woodworker and it is very common to see my mum's pictures hanging in the houses that I get work in."
Mary Gernat's sketchy, energetic style is probably familiar to nearly every child who bought a paperback book in the 1960s. The range of titles she provided covers for was wide: from Enid Blyton's St Clare's, Mallory Towers and The Mystery of... series through countryside stories like Monica Edwards to Malcolm Saville's adventures. It's probably fair to say she is better known as a cover artist than as an illustrator, although she did illustrate many children's books: as illustrator of Sheila McCullagh's Pirate and other early reader series, her illustrations were probably an intrinsic part of many children's early reading efforts.
She had a very distinctive, sketchy style, which was well suited to situations full of action. I am particularly fond of her cover for the 1960s Armada printing of I Carried The Horn, which I think wonderfully captures the awful tension of the moment. Mary Gernat was good at capturing that moment, if not always so good at anatomical accuracy!
Tracking down which covers Mary Gernat was responsible for is complicated. The fact she produced covers rather than internal illustrations means it is particularly difficult to track down exactly what she did, as for many books Armada and Dragon tended to keep the original internal illustrations, and it's the internal illustrator who tends to be listed at the copyright libraries, and rarely a separate cover artist.
Her covers are often confused with those of Peter Archer, an artist frequently used by Collins/Armada, so it's worth checking if it's important to you who did what. The two styles are quite similar, and the cover artist is not always credited, or even, in the case of Monica Edwards' "Cargo of Horses", credited to the wrong artist: although the artist credit is Peter Archer, the style looks much more like Mary Gernat. Tracking titles down then can sometimes be a case of simply following your instincts. Her married name was
Thank you to Roger How for giving me permission to use these images of his mother's work.
Sources: many thanks to Mary Gernat's family for providing biographical information"
 
GERNAT, Mary (I00147)
 
39 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I607)
 
40 From Ann Waldemar, Granddaughter:
Donald was the second son of Frank and Alma How. He attended Longfellow grade school and graduated from South High.
Donald studied civil engineering, attending the University of Minnesota from 1927 to 1930. He left the university after his third year and married Evelyn Samdal in the summer of 1930. They honeymooned at Niagara Falls, New York.
He worked as a surveyor for the Minnesota Highway Department while continuing his education, ultimately receiving a certificate in Civil Engineering.
Donald and Evelyn began their family in 1934 and would raise five surviving children in the decades that witnessed the Great Depression and the Second World War. In 1941 when war was declared, Donald went to work for Bros Boiler Mfg. Co. in Minneapolis, doing what is believed to be the design and engineering of steam boilers for war ships, returning to the Highway Department after the war.
Known for his strong work ethic, Donald rose up through the ranks, first working on a survey crew, then advancing to the level of Design Engineer and, ultimately, Project Engineer. He was well respected by his peers and by those who worked for him. At the time of his retirement in 1970 he had given forty one years of service to the Minnesota Department of Transportation.
Fighting lymphatic leukaemia throughout his retirement years, Donald would still enjoy his children and their growing families and would travel to visit them as often as his health would permit. He enjoyed puttering around Dick's and Mary's farm, made several trips out to California for visits and also flew out to Guam in 1974 while his son-in-law was stationed there with the U.S. Navy.
 
HOW, Donald Benson (I00078)
 
41 From Commonwealth War Graves Comission:
Flight Lieutenant [Pilot) Douglas James How, 37806, holder of the Distinguished Flying Cross, serving with the Royal Air Force, 61 Squadron, died on 13 September 1940, age 26 and is buried in Plot 13, Row A, Grave B in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, France. He was the son of Alfred B. How and Edith E. How, husband of Jessie How of St. Leonards-on-sea, Sussex.
Boulogne Eastern Cemetery is one of the Town Cemeteries and stands on high ground on the eastern side of Boulogne, on the road to St. Omer.
 
HOW, Douglas James (I00132)
 
42 From Findagrave website:
"How, Dorothy M. (nee Biggs) September 9, 2010. Beloved wife of the late Robert How; dear daughter of the late Harry and Audrey Biggs; dear mother of Deborah Evering and step-mother of Lynnda Light, Gayle (Robert ) O'Keefe and the late Michael How; dear grandmother of Michael Jr., Jessica, Brian Robert and Erin; dear sister of the late Betty Nimmo, Jewel Keown, Robert and Carl Biggs; our dear aunt, great aunt, great-great aunt and dear friend. Services: Funeral 10:00 a.m. Monday, September 13, 2010 at JAY B. SMITH Funeral Home, 7456 Manchester. Interment Our Redeemer Cemetery. Memorials to Stray Rescue of St. Louis, 1463 S. 18th Street, St. Louis, MO 63104, 31-771-6121. Visitation Sunday 4:00-8:00 p.m.
BIGGS, Dorothy M (I724)
 
43 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Private (I00146)
 
44 From K Wachter's book "Charlotte Jemima was one of 17 children. Her sister, Rhoda Naomi Massett Butterworth, married to John L. Butterworth in 1840, was a favoured aunt of Thomas Waldo.
Frank How at age 13, in an early diary, mentions visiting his great-aunt Rhoda?s grave in Bristol with his father. This was during a visit from his father while attending Colston Boarding School in Bristol, England [c.1884]"
 
MASSETT, Charlotte Jemima (I00025)
 
45 From K Wachter's book:
"Uncle Jim appears to have been a kindly regarded uncle of the T Waldo How children.
He wrote a wonderfully flowery letter to Alma How after receiving a photograph from Frank of the new baby Donald"
 
HOW, James Nicholas (I00027)
 
46 From Kay Wachter's book:
"Gordon Hilson How was born on 16 Jan 1911, the third child of Frank and Alma How. Gordon graduated from Minneapolis South High School in 1928. He was a gifted trombone player in the school band that won State honors in 1927 and 1928. The band was asked to participate in a national gathering of other award winning high school bands at Joliet, Illinois. These bands had the great honor of playing under the direction of John Philip Sousa. After high school, Gordon worked at the Minneapolis Soldiers Home as a chauffeur and mechanic. During this time, he took engineering classes at the University of Minnesota and an auto Mechanics course at Dunwoody Institute. Gordon enjoyed learning and took many classes throughout his lifetime. He enlisted in the Minnesota National Guard in 1929 and was called to active duty twice. During his enlistment he played trombone in the Army Band' which he truly enjoyed. He married Grace Amelia Seashore on 2 Jun 1945 at her family's farm in Buffalo MN and on 5 Sep 1947 their son Gerald was born. Gordon was employed by the State Of Minnesota Highway Department where he worked as a Civil Engineer for 27 years until he retired in 1973. After retirement, he enjoyed going to his son's farm (which is the original farmstead of Grace'S family) in Buffalo MN, spending time with his grandson Brian, and later his great grandchildren Hazel and Craig. Gordon and Grace sold their home in 1995, after residing in South Minneapolis for 50 years' and moved into the original farmhouse on the Buffalo farm. Gordon died on 18 May, 1999."
Notes by Rosa How, daughter-in-law
 
HOW, Gordon Hilson (I00103)
 
47 From Kay Wachter's book:
'My dear Father', wrote Frank How on May 16, 1905 to his father in England, '.....Alma gave birth to a baby boy at 3 minutes before midnight'. Francis Waldo How, the first child of Samuel Francis Stephen and Alma Benson How, was born at their home in Minneapolis. During his childhood Francis was active in Boy Scouts and church activities. He attended local schools and graduated from South High in 1923. Francis then attended the University of Minnesota, graduating on March 17, 1927 with a Bachelor's Degree in Civil Engineering. His first job as an engineer was with the Minnesota Highway Department where his job title was 'Computer'. During his adulthood, Francis had many interests and made many friends. He was active in the Presbyterian Church and served as an elder. For several years he was a Boy Scout leader and served a troop as a councilman.
 
HOW, Samuel Francis Stephen (I00042)
 
48 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I00094)
 
49 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I00074)
 
50 From Kay Wachter's book:
Memo from the Family Register:
Frank and Alma with their little son Francis Waldo How arrived at Plymouth on Wednesday, June 12th 1907 - reaching 3 Gleneagle Villas 11.30 p.m. - per S.S. "Oceanic". They left for London - Saturday, July 6th.
Editor's Notes: Little is known about this trip other than from a few post cards, a few photos and comments remembered.
From diary excerpts, Alma had been quite busy sewing in preparation for the trip.
Alma was very early pregnant with her second child ? not the best time to be taking an ocean voyage! She did not feel well for most of the visit and ocean crossings.
A post card was waiting at Gleneagle Villas from Rhoda in Swansea, welcoming Frank and Alma to England.
Another post card came from "Marjorie", inviting Francis to a children's picnic.
And one more post card to Frank from Cornwall stating that Cornish pasties were being sent, as the sender remembered how much Frank had liked them. This was from Mrs. Gillbard, wife of the farmer Frank had worked for in Cornwall.
 
BENSON, Alma Sophia (I00043)
 

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